Twitter Legal Blog

Abusive Debt Collectors

Dealing with a debt collector can be one of life's most stressful experiences. Harassing calls, threats, and use of obscene language can drive you to the edge. What's worse, a collector may embarrass you by contacting your employer, family or neighbors. You may even be hounded to pay a debt that is not rightfully yours. Sure, collection agencies have a job to do. Even so, there are limits on how far a debt collector can go.

Bankruptcy

Bankruptcy laws help people who can no longer pay their creditors get a fresh start by liquidating assets to pay their debts or by creating a repayment plan. Bankruptcy laws also protect troubled businesses and provide for orderly distributions to business creditors through reorganization or liquidation. Most cases are filed under the three main chapters of the Bankruptcy Code; Chapter 7, Chapter 11, and Chapter 13. Federal courts have exclusive jurisdiction over bankruptcy cases. This means that a bankruptcy case cannot be filed in a state court.

Credit Report Errors

Problems on your credit report may include the following: someone else's credit information or accounts appear on your credit report, your accounts are not accurately reflecting your credit history or payment history, accounts that were discharged in bankruptcy are still appearing on your credit report, or information that had been previously removed appears on your credit report again.

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